Video 18 Apr 53 notes

saprophilous:

Tote bag w/ lammergeier design “duoego”

@ my new Society6 store. I’ll be sharing this w/ sevloolves. Look for updates as they should happen now and then. This is something we will be doing for fun!

via SAPRO/.
Photo 17 Apr 90 notes abominablecc:

What Did You Do?

abominablecc:

What Did You Do?

Photo 16 Apr 459 notes tanglefootcomic:

I had a few idle moments and happened to hear that today is Tumblrnational Draw-a-Centaur Day, and thus did this majestic creature come into existence. Pictured here shortly before being taken to the knackery and turned into glue and inexpensive pet food.

tanglefootcomic:

I had a few idle moments and happened to hear that today is Tumblrnational Draw-a-Centaur Day, and thus did this majestic creature come into existence. Pictured here shortly before being taken to the knackery and turned into glue and inexpensive pet food.

Photo 13 Apr 35,677 notes jennerallydrawing:

I’m not super great at gif-ing things, but here you guys go!

jennerallydrawing:

I’m not super great at gif-ing things, but here you guys go!

Photo 12 Apr 26 notes oldroze:

Burgonet

Filippo Negroli (Italian, Milan, ca. 1510–1579)

This masterpiece of Renaissance metalwork is signed on the browplate by Filippo Negroli, whose embossed armor was praised by sixteenth-century writers as “miraculous” and deserving “immortal merit.” Formed of one plate of steel and patinated to look like bronze, the bowl is raised in high relief with motifs inspired by classical art. The graceful mermaidlike siren forming the helmet’s comb holds a grimacing head of Medusa by the hair. The sides of the helmet are covered with acanthus scrolls inhabited by putti, a motif ultimately derived from ancient Roman sculpture and wall paintings.

oldroze:

Burgonet

Filippo Negroli (Italian, Milan, ca. 1510–1579)

This masterpiece of Renaissance metalwork is signed on the browplate by Filippo Negroli, whose embossed armor was praised by sixteenth-century writers as “miraculous” and deserving “immortal merit.” Formed of one plate of steel and patinated to look like bronze, the bowl is raised in high relief with motifs inspired by classical art. The graceful mermaidlike siren forming the helmet’s comb holds a grimacing head of Medusa by the hair. The sides of the helmet are covered with acanthus scrolls inhabited by putti, a motif ultimately derived from ancient Roman sculpture and wall paintings.

via OLD ROSE.
Photo 12 Apr 23 notes hannahblumenreich:

2dcloud:

Today is LineWork NW. Sean Christensen composed this short interview with Hannah Blumenreich who is tabling for 2DC today at said event. I was unable to find where it was posted so as to re-tumblr it (is that the lingo, sorry lingor?), soooo, here it is again or for the first time, enjoy!
Describe the first piece of art that changed your life.  When was it?  How old were you?  Where on the planet were you standing?
I don’t remember exactly when this was, maybe fourteen or fifteen, but I’d always sort of assumed that original art was too precious to be put on display in museums, so everything I saw must have been a copy and the real art was stowed away somewhere safe. (This probably comes from memories of childhood and like, not being allowed in certain rooms in people’s houses, or not being allowed to touch the “good dishes” because I might “break them.”) But then my family went on a trip to New York and we went to the Met where I saw Washington Crossing the Delaware by Leutze, and I was like, “Hold up. This is far too big to be a copy.” (My flawless logic at work. It’s a miracle I made it this far in life.) And I had an epiphany that everything I was looking at was the original and it absolutely blew my tiny, stupid little mind. My dad especially likes to remind me of this event. Like, all the time. 
If you were in charge of a small press show like Linework, how would your tastes shape the event?
Terribly. 
Who are five people that helped you get to the place you are now with your current work?  What did they contribute?
Well, my parents, I’ll stick them together as one unit. They never pressured me to go into med school or law school or anything, they were like, “Yeah, sure, go make comics.” (Mom, Dad, no, think about what you’re doing, don’t you care about my future.)
I had a really great teacher at MCAD, he really helped my work improve a lot and quickly. Like, by the end of one semester I could look back and be embarrassed about how terrible my comics were. Which is a great feeling! It means you’re getting better. Presumably.  
I’ve capped off at two. I’m sorry. This is so much harder than it should be. Why would you make me come up with five. FIVE. It’s so many. 
What do you think you can contribute to someone else who is trying to make progress with their small press or artistic projects?
Not a whole heck of a lot. Like, if someone came up to me and was like, “Please give me your advice on how to be good and successful at comics,” I’d be like, “You poor misguided child, you have singled out the worst possible person to ask this question.”  
So, I dunno, make more work (this is what everyone says, so there must be some truth to it), make connections, and uh, don’t die before your time or you’ll be a ghost. Also, find artists who inspire you to be a better artist! Hell, just find people who inspire you to work. Watch Jiro Dreams of Sushi. Watch your friends succeed around you as you remain stagnant. 
If you could design a monument, what would it look like and what would it represent?
It would be a penis. It would represent a penis. It could go next to the Washington Monument. Twinsies. 
What kinds of obstacles do you encounter in your work, and how do you overcome them?
Finishing projects, for sure. I am a gigundo procrastinator, so it’s easy for me to push things off or just decide things can wait “till tomorrow.” I can also get pretty bummed about the future of a project. It’s tough when you work so hard on something and then it doesn’t sell well or people just ignore it. It can make it difficult to care about a new comic because you’re convinced it will have a similar fate.  
Fixing procrastination is about breaking bad habits, which is hard. I happen to be a great lover of lists and organizing, so it helps to make to-do lists of things to get done for the month/week/day, or make a list of pages to have done. It’s good to see it all laid out instead of just picturing in my head how much I have to do. I get intimidated by the size of new projects, but if it’s laid out on paper, it’s not so scary. 
If anyone knows how to fix feelings of inadequacy due to past disappointments, please let me know. 
If Linework was a country, who should be the president and why?  This can be anyone in history or in the world.
If Linework were a country? Where are you putting it? Will it interfere with preexisting country boarders? Are the other conventions countries, too? Is there like, a country of TCAF? I need details before I commit, here.
 
Pick a zine or small press item you really like, and promote the shit out of it right here:
By the power vested in me, I promote 2D Cloud!! I’m tabling for them, and it will probably end in disaster. Sorry in advance. 

LineworkNW is today! If you’re in the Portland area, come on down and say hi. Buy some things so I can tell Raighne and Justin everything went well. Otherwise I will have to lie to them. And that would be bad. Sorry it’s super long, this was my first ever time getting interviewed and I got a bit carried away. 

hannahblumenreich:

2dcloud:

Today is LineWork NW. Sean Christensen composed this short interview with Hannah Blumenreich who is tabling for 2DC today at said event. I was unable to find where it was posted so as to re-tumblr it (is that the lingo, sorry lingor?), soooo, here it is again or for the first time, enjoy!

Describe the first piece of art that changed your life.  When was it?  How old were you?  Where on the planet were you standing?

I don’t remember exactly when this was, maybe fourteen or fifteen, but I’d always sort of assumed that original art was too precious to be put on display in museums, so everything I saw must have been a copy and the real art was stowed away somewhere safe. (This probably comes from memories of childhood and like, not being allowed in certain rooms in people’s houses, or not being allowed to touch the “good dishes” because I might “break them.”) But then my family went on a trip to New York and we went to the Met where I saw Washington Crossing the Delaware by Leutze, and I was like, “Hold up. This is far too big to be a copy.” (My flawless logic at work. It’s a miracle I made it this far in life.) And I had an epiphany that everything I was looking at was the original and it absolutely blew my tiny, stupid little mind. My dad especially likes to remind me of this event. Like, all the time. 

If you were in charge of a small press show like Linework, how would your tastes shape the event?

Terribly. 

Who are five people that helped you get to the place you are now with your current work?  What did they contribute?

Well, my parents, I’ll stick them together as one unit. They never pressured me to go into med school or law school or anything, they were like, “Yeah, sure, go make comics.” (Mom, Dad, no, think about what you’re doing, don’t you care about my future.)

I had a really great teacher at MCAD, he really helped my work improve a lot and quickly. Like, by the end of one semester I could look back and be embarrassed about how terrible my comics were. Which is a great feeling! It means you’re getting better. Presumably.  

I’ve capped off at two. I’m sorry. This is so much harder than it should be. Why would you make me come up with five. FIVE. It’s so many. 

What do you think you can contribute to someone else who is trying to make progress with their small press or artistic projects?

Not a whole heck of a lot. Like, if someone came up to me and was like, “Please give me your advice on how to be good and successful at comics,” I’d be like, “You poor misguided child, you have singled out the worst possible person to ask this question.”  

So, I dunno, make more work (this is what everyone says, so there must be some truth to it), make connections, and uh, don’t die before your time or you’ll be a ghost. Also, find artists who inspire you to be a better artist! Hell, just find people who inspire you to work. Watch Jiro Dreams of Sushi. Watch your friends succeed around you as you remain stagnant. 

If you could design a monument, what would it look like and what would it represent?

It would be a penis. It would represent a penis. It could go next to the Washington Monument. Twinsies. 

What kinds of obstacles do you encounter in your work, and how do you overcome them?

Finishing projects, for sure. I am a gigundo procrastinator, so it’s easy for me to push things off or just decide things can wait “till tomorrow.” I can also get pretty bummed about the future of a project. It’s tough when you work so hard on something and then it doesn’t sell well or people just ignore it. It can make it difficult to care about a new comic because you’re convinced it will have a similar fate.  

Fixing procrastination is about breaking bad habits, which is hard. I happen to be a great lover of lists and organizing, so it helps to make to-do lists of things to get done for the month/week/day, or make a list of pages to have done. It’s good to see it all laid out instead of just picturing in my head how much I have to do. I get intimidated by the size of new projects, but if it’s laid out on paper, it’s not so scary. 

If anyone knows how to fix feelings of inadequacy due to past disappointments, please let me know. 

If Linework was a country, who should be the president and why?  This can be anyone in history or in the world.

If Linework were a country? Where are you putting it? Will it interfere with preexisting country boarders? Are the other conventions countries, too? Is there like, a country of TCAF? I need details before I commit, here.

 

Pick a zine or small press item you really like, and promote the shit out of it right here:

By the power vested in me, I promote 2D Cloud!! I’m tabling for them, and it will probably end in disaster. Sorry in advance. 

LineworkNW is today! If you’re in the Portland area, come on down and say hi. Buy some things so I can tell Raighne and Justin everything went well. Otherwise I will have to lie to them. And that would be bad. 

Sorry it’s super long, this was my first ever time getting interviewed and I got a bit carried away. 

Photo 11 Apr 155 notes debora-cheyenne:

eve
via PATÉ.
Photo 10 Apr 44 notes sportdhiver:

Katalinga Vermouchu - Eclaireur aéroporté sourcier, sauf quand il pleut - L46

sportdhiver:

Katalinga Vermouchu - Eclaireur aéroporté sourcier, sauf quand il pleut - L46

Photo 10 Apr 180 notes sportdhiver:

BOREAL HUNTERS - explorers - C7

sportdhiver:

BOREAL HUNTERS - explorers - C7

Photo 9 Apr 1,823 notes choodraws:

stare directly into the camera like you’re on the fucking office

choodraws:

stare directly into the camera like you’re on the fucking office

Photo 9 Apr 34 notes lllllllle:

なんか結局女性描くほうが楽ではある

lllllllle:

なんか結局女性描くほうが楽ではある

Photo 8 Apr 281 notes ronasaurus:

Turnip feels taller standing on my shoulder.

ronasaurus:

Turnip feels taller standing on my shoulder.

Photo 31 Mar 168 notes msmollym:

WIP can not wait to color this! ~~ Big drawings are fun.

msmollym:

WIP can not wait to color this! ~~ Big drawings are fun.

Photo 31 Mar 257 notes alexthebeck:

This piece was made with the intention of capturing the impersonal nature of addiction. An act so intimate, yet not. An unholy ritual."Passengers on the Wagon"30x45 in, oil on linen

alexthebeck:

This piece was made with the intention of capturing the impersonal nature of addiction. An act so intimate, yet not. An unholy ritual.

"Passengers on the Wagon"
30x45 in, oil on linen

Video 28 Mar 397 notes

kekai-k:

Bijinder, Kikaider-00 and a quick mock line up of the rest of the Kikaider characters


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